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Mixing active and passive investment strategies requires a decision process that is structured, defendable and repeatable.

Most of us blend active and passive funds in our portfolios. It makes sense. But how many of us make the choice through a process that is truly robust?

Vanguard’s newly developed framework for successfully blending active and passive investments provides a process for determining the right blend for your clients.

Ask about our workshops or get in touch to learn more.



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Interactive Infographic
Explore an infographic explaining the active/passive framework. Follow the four step process.

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Active or passive? Art or science?
Watch a quick introduction to our active/passive framework.

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The active/passive choice
Vanguard’s four critical factors in blending active and passive investments.




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The value of investments, and the income from them, may fall or rise and investors may get back less than they invested.